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« Farm Animal of the Week: Dali the Pot-Bellied Pig | Main | Tomato Seed Winners! »

February 13, 2008

Comments

Flo in Texas

I love the taste of celery, usually cooked in soup, sauces, where it is pureed. However I have trouble growing it here in Houston area. My Grandmother use something that looked like celery leaves, and thin celery stems, think it might have been an herb. Any ideas....

Janice

July 17, 2011. This spring I grew Celeriac for the first time and grew from seed. I've grown both C. 'Brilliant' & 'Mars'.
All plants are now in a raised bed with Cabbage Red Acre Heirloom & Spaghetti Squash. I direct sowed the Spaghetti Squash yesterday and will grow vertically up a heavy duty trellis system.
I have just read that Celeriac and Squash/Pumpkins should not be grown together, however, I can find no explanation as to why. By chance do you have an explanation for this, or is this internet misinformation??

Michelle

I'm relieved to hear they take so long to grow. I pulled one today as the stalk and leaves around 12 inches tall but there was no bulb to speak of. Wondered if I'd flopped. I'll leave them in longer thanks to your post.

Linda Rayworth

Try steaming the peeled cubed root and then drain well. Mash with a little cream, plenty of pepper (check the salt) and put into the oven with a little butter over the top to brown. Serve with your Sunday roast - incredible!

Else Hampenberg

I'm Danish and love celery root. I drive 100 miles to purchase it. I tried to grow celery root but apparently didn't give it enough grow time. I use celery in soups or dice and cream the celery, then make nice firm meat balls, add to creamed cellery. Serve on a rice bed. Super delicious.

Agriculture Guide

Seeing your seedling pics is a good motivator. Haven't tried Celeraic but I might try it as I do like the root. Thank you.

Rodger Cresswell

I started to grow Celeriac over 30 years ago when I had my first garden. I had not eaten it before, in fact I had never heard of it or tasted it. From the first year it grew well for me and we enjoyed it so much as a vegetable with dinner or in a soup. Ugly it might be but we have grown it and enjoyed it every year since.

Jodi Avery

Peeled and cubed.Simmered until tender w/some pumpkin cubes left over from the carving. Sauteed garlic, onion, and a hot chili pepper. Added all w/org.chicken stock and finely chopped cilantro.Pureed into a WOW soup--according to guinea pig dinner guests.

Love Apple Farm

Craig: Celeriac is ready to pick when you determine that the bulb size is big enough to be worth your while. In other words, it can be harvested small or when it gets bigger, such as softball sized. Once it starts to send up its flower spike, it's no longer edible. So assuming you don't have that issue, then you can start harvesting it now. You can't keep it growing after you harvest it. It's something like cabbage: you only get one crack at it.

Craig Ruff

In Michigan, US, I planted celeriac in the spring of the last year. I did not harvest last fall. By now (mid June,) of the following year, the above-ground growth is 5-6 feet. Should I harvest the roots now? Is there a way to re-seed for next year? Celeriac is one of my favorite root crops in cooking, but I don't have a clue as to when to harvest or how to keep my plants growing.

THEA

I discovered celeriac November 2007 while searching recipe sites for a soup course to compliment our Thanksgiving meal. I found one---Bon Apetit NOV 2005 celery root bisque w/ thyme croutons. Everyone loved it and I get requests regularly to make it. I just recently purchased a peeler from the AS SEEN ON TV store that is "supposed to" make peeling butternut squash etc. very easy so I'm hoping it will save my wrists for the next batch of bisque. Will keep you posted on that---but check out that recipe. ****AMAZING****

Jennifer

You're absolutely right....they take forever and a day to turn into something you'd be willing to pluck from the earth. My husband is from France, and over there I fell in love with "Celeri Remoulade," a mix of shredded celeriac, splash of lemon juice, a little bit of mayo and some dijon mustard. It is the bomb! When I first saw it, I thought it'd be like coleslaw, but no, its more mellow, and even though I didn't grow up with it, I still find it a "comforting" food. I planted seeds here in northern California's Sacramento valley during the spring, (1.5 years ago!) and just today harvested a couple of bulbs. I'd almost forgotten that I planted those seeds....that's how long they take. But that remoulade is definately worth it. Give it a try!

Marlene

I love celeriac! I am half Swiss and it is a favorite salad in my family. I make a simple recipe: whisk some olive oil and lemon juice together. Add a little mayo and whisk till smooth. Salt to taste. Cut the celery root into very thin matchsticks on a mandoline. Marinate for several hours in the sauce, or overnight. Add more salt if needed plus a little white pepper. I could eat a whole bowl of this.

Brenda Feltham

Very cool. I was totally unfamiliar with celeriac. I had heard of celery root but I had never seen it. While I don't have the dedicated space to try growing it I appreciate your article exposing me to different veggies.

Mike (tfb)

Thanks for the info and pics. I have a packet of seed (Giant Prague - 120 days) and I'm trying out celeriac for the first time. It's maybe a little late to start, but I'm sure it'll work out. I'll only plant a tray or two this time. Seeing your seedling pics is a good motivator, 'cause sometimes try-out-for-fun crops get lost in the shuffle when things get busy!

janine

Celeriac is an awesome root veggie! I use it a lot private cheffing. I especially love Celeriac Root Gratin. Peel them, then make the exact way you would potatoes au gratin..yummm!!=)

Mary Duval

ha ha, those celery roots do look ugly, but mmmmmm what a diamond in the rough. Years ago I grew them in a spot with some afternoon shade because we have such hot summers here (Sacramento California). They did alright. I'd like to give them another try.
Thanks for your great website! It's fun to read.
Mary

peggy

I love celeriac! I have for years, even before it became popular (again). It's great in soup & stew (doesn't get bitter like celery)& it's wonderful raw, grated with a nice vinegarette. Oh yea, greated or sliced & barely steamed with a really garlic-y vinegarette cold as a salad. (on the order of marinated artichoke hearts)

Emmanuelle

I am French, and celeriac is commonly eaten in France, either raw, in a salad, shredded like you would shred carrots, seasoned with a mustard vinaigrette, or cooked: I make a celeriac, sunchoke, potato, garlic puree that is to die for, especially when drizzled with a little white truffle oil right before serving! I have also roasted it along other root vegetables and its strong flavor provides a welcome kick. Huge fan here!

Chris Stanek

I grew celery with no problem. Haven't tried Celeraic but I might try it as I do like the root. Great seasoning.

Lauren

I grew celeriac last year for the first time, and now I will try to grow it every year. The sturdy seedlings transplanted beautifully into the garden, and celeriac proved to be a strong, tough crop in my sometimes very dry Colorado garden. Best of all, I loved using the celeriac stalks and leaves in soups and stock. They impart a lovely celery-like, yet stronger and more exotic flavor to food, but are very bitter if eaten, so must be removed after used for flavoring food. The cut stalks lasted for what seemed like forever in the vegetable drawer after I picked them before the first hard frost. I used these stalks and leaves to flavor the cavity of my free-range christmas chicken, and the stock that followed. And I haven't even mentioned the root, which is what this plant is really grown for! I highly recommend this vegetable.

Janet

Thanks for the informative post. I plan to grow celeriac for the first time this year, and I'm hoping for some beginner's luck.

Farmgirl Susan

Thanks for such a helpful post, Cynthia. I haven't grown celeriac from seed in years, and I didn't have much luck with it, but now that you've told us all its secrets I'm inspired to give it another try!

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